The company had not only a new logo, but a new name.

The company had not only a new logo, but a new name. No longer was it Next. It was NeXT. Others might not have understood the need to obsess over a logo, much less pay $100,000 for one. But for Jobs it meant that NeXT was

starting life with a world-class feel and identity, even if it hadn’t yet designed its first product. As Markkula had taught him, a great company must be able to impute its values from the first impression it makes.

In order to translate the NeXT logo into the look of real products, Jobs needed an industrial designer he trusted. He talked

to a few possibilities, but none of them impressed him as much as the wild Bavarian he had imported to

Apple: Hartmut Esslinger, whose frogdesign had set up shop in Silicon Valley and who, thanks to Jobs, had a lucrative contract with Apple. Getting

IBM to permit Paul Rand to do work for NeXT was a small miracle willed into

existence by Jobs’s belief that reality can be distorted. But that was a snap

compared to the likelihood that he could convince Apple to permit Esslinger to work for NeXT.

This did not keep Jobs from trying. At the beginning of November 1985, just five weeks after Apple filed suit against him,

Jobs wrote to Eisenstat and asked for a dispensation. “I spoke with Hartmut Esslinger this weekend and he

suggested I write you a note expressing why I wish to work with him and frogdesign on the new products for

NeXT,” he said. Astonishingly, Jobs’s argument was that he did not know what Apple had in the works, but Esslinger did.

“NeXT has no knowledge as to the current or future directions of Apple’s

product designs, nor do other design firms we might deal with, so it is possible to inadvertently design similar looking

products. It is in both Apple’s and NeXT’s best interest to rely on Hartmut’s professionalism to make sure this does

not occur.” Eisenstat recalled being flabbergasted by Jobs’s audacity,

and he replied curtly. “I have previously expressed my concern on behalf of Apple that you are engaged in a business course

which involves your utilization of Apple’s confidential business information,” he wrote. “Your letter does not alleviate my concern in any way. In fact it heightens my

concern because it states that you have ‘no knowledge as to the current or future directions of Apple’s product designs,’ a

statement which is not true.” What made the request all the more astonishing to Eisenstat was that it was Jobs who, just a year earlier,

had forced frogdesign to

abandon its work on

Wozniak’s remote

control device.

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